Rechercher dans la communauté

Affichage des résultats pour les étiquettes 'center'.



Plus d’options de recherche

  • Rechercher par étiquettes

    Saisir les étiquettes en les séparant par une virgule.
  • Rechercher par auteur

Type du contenu


Forums

  • Projets immobiliers
    • Propositions
    • En Construction
    • Complétés
    • Transports en commun
    • Infrastructures
    • Lieux de culture, sport et divertissement
    • Projets Annulés
  • Discussions générales
    • Urbanisme et architecture
    • Nouvelles économiques
    • Technologie, jeux vidéos et gadgets
    • Technologies urbaines
    • Discussions générales
    • Divertissement, Bouffe et Culture
    • L'actualité
    • Hors Sujet
  • Aviation MTLYUL
    • Discussions générales
    • Spotting à YUL
  • Ici et ailleurs
    • Ville de Québec et reste du Québec
    • Toronto et le reste du Canada
    • États-Unis d'Amérique
    • Europe
    • Projets ailleurs dans le monde.
  • Photographie et vidéos
    • Photographie urbaine
    • Autres photos
    • Anciennes photos

Calendriers

Aucun résultat à afficher.

Aucun résultat à afficher.

Blogs

Aucun résultat à afficher.

Aucun résultat à afficher.


Rechercher les résultats dans…

Rechercher les résultats qui…


Date de création

  • Début

    Fin


Dernière mise à jour

  • Début

    Fin


Filtrer par nombre de…

Inscription

  • Début

    Fin


Groupe


Biography


Location


Intérêts


Occupation

58 résultats trouvés

  1. IluvMTL

    SketchUp

    http://www.sketchup.com/ Products SketchUp Pro SketchUp Make 3D Warehouse Extension Warehouse SketchUp Viewer SketchUp Mobile Viewer [*]Industries Architecture Construction Light Construction & Remodeling Engineering Commercial Interiors Kitchen, Bath & Interior Design Landscape Architecture Urban Planning Game Design Film & Stage Woodworking 3D Printing K12 Education Higher Education [*]Buy New Sketchup Pro Licenses Upgrade a License Renew Support Corporate Solutions Student & Educator Licenses [*]Learn Learn Center Forum Help Center Resources Training Video Tutorials The easiest way to draw in 3D You love what you do. Now love how you do it. What's New?Why SketchUp? MasterSketchUp.com Download SketchUp Get good fast There’s a reason SketchUp is synonymous with friendly and forgiving 3D modeling software: we don’t sacrifice usability for the sake of functionality. Start by drawing lines and shapes. Push and pull surfaces to turn them into 3D forms. Stretch, copy, rotate and paint to make anything you like. If you want to be productive within a couple of hours, you’ve come to the right place.Ready to start learning? Download today, then... ... watch a getting started video. ... learn about SketchUp's tools. ... ask a question in the SketchUp Forums. Find a 3D model of anything Find a 3D model of anything Why model everything from scratch? Whether it’s a chair for the room you’re designing or a rhino for your zoo, you’ll find almost anything you need in SketchUp’s 3D Warehouse, the world’s biggest repository of free 3D models. And anyone can use 3D Warehouse to store and share models. Upload your best work and become a SketchUp legend.Curious what you’ll find in 3D Warehouse? Go ahead, search for a model now… Turn models into stellar drawings Turn models into documents At some point in most 3D projects, you’ll need to turn your model into a set of drawings that gets the point across. LayOut in SketchUp Pro lets you add model views to pages, choose drawing scales, adjust line weights, and add dimensions, callouts, and graphics. Make a change to your SketchUp model, and find it reflected automatically in LayOut. And when it’s time, export PDFs, images and CAD files.Ready to start making staggeringly beautiful documents? Start learning LayOut now.Make SketchUp yours Make SketchUp yours SketchUp is meant to be customized. Thanks to our Ruby API and an amazing community of developers, today you can explore an entire universe of extensions. These are add-on tools built to solve the kind of 3D modeling problems that might otherwise leave you scratching your head. Need to draw 3D moldings? There’s an extension for that. Wouldn’t it be cool to bend your models to fit a curve? That’s possible, too. Photorealistic rendering? Definitely. If you can imagine a SketchUp extension, chances are it already exists.Start customizing your SketchUp today: browse Extension Warehouse.
  2. The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has announced the completion of the Ping An Finance Center in Shenzhen, China, according to CTBUH tall building criteria. At 599 meters (1965 feet), it is now officially the second tallest building in China and the fourth tallest in the world, behind only the Burj Khalifa, Shanghai Tower and Makkah Royal Clock Tower. Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF), the Ping An Finance Center is located in the heart of Shenzhen’s Fuitan District. The building contains over 100 floors of office space located above a large public podium, with a multi-story atrium providing retail, restaurants and transit options to the city and greater Pearl River delta region. The CTBUH describe the form of the tower as a “taught steel cable, outstretched by the sky and the ground at once. At the top of the tower, the façade tapers to form a pyramid, giving the tower a prismatic aesthetic.” The form is further emphasized by eight composite “megacolumns” along the building envelope that streamline the building for improved structural and wind performance, reducing baseline wind loads by 35 percent. The facade of the building is one the project most innovative features; its use of 1,700 tons of 316L stainless steel make the envelope the largest stainless steel facade system in the world. The specific material was chosen for its corrosion-resistance, which will allow the building to maintain its appearance for decades even in the city’s salty coastal atmosphere. http://www.archdaily.com/868015/ctbuh-crowns-ping-an-finance-center-as-worlds-4th-tallest-building
  3. The Global Financial Center Index published by the China Development Institude and Z/Yen partners in London ranks financials centers worlwide based on criterias such as business stability and environnement, technology and assessment by the financial community. Montreal ranks 14th up 1 spot since the last ranking 6 months ago, ahead of cities such as Geneva, Frankfurt or Paris. Highest ranked city in Canada is Toronto in 10th place, London tops chart ahead of New York and Singapore to round top 3. http://www.longfinance.net/images/gfci/gfci_21.pdf
  4. https://blog.cogecopeer1.com/why-montreal-is-fast-emerging-as-canadas-cloud-hub?utm_campaign=FY16%20Inbound%20GLOBAL%20Mar%20Colocation%20Digital&utm_content=32715745&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin
  5. https://blog.cogecopeer1.com/why-montreal-is-fast-emerging-as-canadas-cloud-hub?utm_campaign=FY16%20Inbound%20GLOBAL%20Mar%20Colocation%20Digital&utm_content=31021264&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin So, what makes Montreal attractive for tech startups and cloud providers? The city has low power and real estate costs, making Canada’s second largest financial center more attractive to Canadian organizations. The city’s cold climate is a big advantage. One of the largest costs of running a data center is providing cooling for hardware, and having a supply of freezing cold air for much of the year helps. Montreal, with a population of a million and a half, has a plentiful supply of engineers, and is home to the largest concentration of research complexes in Canada, so is not short of skilled workers. Then there is the abundant supply of green power. It is one of the most inexpensive means of generating electricity, and for organizations requiring power hungry SANs and scaled out storage, cheap power is more attractive than the cheap connectivity offered by a city with a peering exchange.
  6. andre md

    Hymne national du Canada Dallas Texas

    Felicitation a la chanteuse americaine Celena Rae pour avoir chanter l'hymne national du canada dans les deux langues (francais et anglais) ce soir durant la partie canadiens-stars au American Airlines Center a Dallas, Texas.
  7. http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/i2c-opens-global-operations-center-in-montreal-canada-to-support-customer-growth-562385221.html
  8. Nouveau projet St. Jacques coin Versailles la ou ce trouve presentement un Provi Soir et nettoyeur sur le lot. Right on the edge of Ville Marie/Sud Ouest just north of Griffintown and in the shadow of the proposed CF project at the Bell Center. Pas certain si c'est approuver ou non la batisse sur la pencarte a envrion 4 etages. Google map for good view of the corner. Quartier1435.com
  9. Credit : Le Point.fr À plus de 380 mètres de haut, les visiteurs pourront admirer, dès le 29 mai, tous les monuments et célèbres parcs de New York. Terminé en 2013, le plus haut gratte-ciel de la ville a accueilli ses premiers occupants à l'automne. Pour les New-Yorkais, il s'agit d'écrire une nouvelle page après le traumatisme des attentats, il y a presque 14 ans. Une fois les portiques de sécurité passés, les visiteurs embarquent dans un ascenseur aux parois animées. Toute l'histoire de New York y défile sous leurs yeux. Sur des écrans LED, on découvre la mégalopole se construisant à toute allure, depuis les pâturages jusqu'à la ville actuelle et ses gratte-ciel. Les anciennes tours du World Trade Center y apparaissent très brièvement.Le voyage dure 47 secondes, le temps d'accéder au 100e étage de la tour et à la clé un panorama à couper le souffle. Trois à quatre millions de visiteurs sont attendus au cours de la première année. L'entrée coûte 32 dollars pour les adultes et 26 dollars pour les enfants.
  10. Interesting series on PBS on Wednesdays at 22:00 http://www.pbs.org/program/super-skyscrapers/ About the Program As urban space shrinks, we build higher and faster than ever before, creating a new generation of skyscrapers. Super skyscrapers are pushing the limits of engineering, technology and design to become greener, stronger, smarter and more luxurious than their predecessors. This four-part series follows the creation of four extraordinary buildings, showcasing how they will revolutionize the way we live, work and protect ourselves from potential threats. Read more about each episode below. A Closer Look at Super Skyscrapers One World Trade Center Blink Films UK 1 / 12 About the Episodes One World Trade Center (Premiered February 5, 2014) One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the western hemisphere and a famous modern landmark, is engineered to be the safest and strongest skyscraper ever built. This episode follows the final year of exterior construction, culminating with the milestone of reaching the symbolic height of 1,776 feet. For head of construction Steve Plate, as well as scientists, engineers, ironworkers and curtain wall installers, this is a construction job suffused with the history of the site and a sense of duty to rebuild from the ashes of Ground Zero. Building the Future (Premiered February 12, 2014) Commonly known as “the cheese grater,” the Leadenhall Building is the pinnacle of London’s avant-garde architecture. Designed as a tapered tower with a steel exoskeleton, it’s the tallest skyscraper in the City of London and the most innovative. The teams behind the Leadenhall project had to radically rethink every aspect of the traditional building model. This program follows the monumental challenges that come with erecting this super skyscraper: it will be constructed off-site, delivered to location, and stacked and bolted together like a giant Lego set. The Vertical City (Premiered February 19, 2014) Shanghai Tower isn’t just a skyscraper — it’s a vertical city, a collection of businesses, services and hotels all in one place, fitting a population the size of Monaco into a footprint the size of a football field. Within its walls, residents can literally work, rest, play and relax in public parks, looking up through 12 stories of clear space. Not just one, however, but eight of them, stacked on top of each other, all the way to the 120th floor. When complete, the structure will dominate Shanghai’s skyline, towering over its neighbors as a testament to China’s economic success and the ambitions of the city’s wealthy elite. The Billionaire Building (Premiered February 26, 2014) Upon completion, One57, on Manhattan’s 57th Street, will rise more than 1,000 feet, making it the tallest residential tower in the western hemisphere and boasting spectacular views of Central Park. “One57” follows the teams tasked with creating New York’s most luxurious residential skyscraper and their ambition to redefine luxury living the big city. Condominiums at One57 showcase state-of-the-art interiors — double-height ceilings, full-floor apartments, bathrooms clad in the finest Italian marble and the finest material finishes. Super Skyscrapers was produced by Blink Films. sent via Tapatalk
  11. IluvMTL

    Project for Public Spaces (PPS)

    Site internet: http://www.pps.org/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/projectforpublicspaces About Placemaking for Communities Project for Public Spaces (PPS) is a nonprofit planning, design and educational organization dedicated to helping people create and sustain public spaces that build stronger communities. Our pioneering Placemaking approach helps citizens transform their public spaces into vital places that highlight local assets, spur rejuvenation and serve common needs. PPS was founded in 1975 to apply and expand on the work of William (Holly) Whyte, the author of The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces. Since then, we have completed projects in over 3000 communities in 43 countries and all 50 US states. Partnering with public and private organizations, federal, state and municipal agencies, business improvement districts, neighborhood associations and other civic groups, we improve communities by fostering successful public spaces. Having been brought into to apply Placemaking in a broad range of contexts around the world, an increasing focus of our work is in training and capacity building, often helping to build local Placemaking organizations. PPS trains more than 10,000 people every year and reaches countless more through our websites and publications. PPS is the internationally recognized center for resources, tools and inspiration about Placemaking. Through research, conferences, and strategic partnerships, PPS promotes Placemaking through a series of transformative agendas to address some of the most pressing issues of our time. Our Building Community Through Transportation agenda runs a biannual ProWalk/ProBike conference through our National Center for Bicycling & Walking (NCBW) which is a resident program of PPS. Our leadership on Public Markets has included a regular international conference series as well. Internationally, we are looking to influence the governance of developing cities and nations though our partnership with UN Habitat. We are doing this through trainings and projects and a joint conference series, called the Future of Places, that will culminate in a written document to encourage the adoption of Placemaking principles at the Habitat III UN global gathering in 2016. Through the development of a Placemaking Leadership Council (including over 500 members) PPS is working to support a broad network to drive the further evolution of Placemaking and build its potential impact as a movement. In its broadest application, Placemaking is a catalyst for building healthy, sustainable and economically viable cities of the future. Agendas PPS is structured around seven agendas that have the potential to transform cities by breaking down what Placemaking means and how it can happen. These agendas form a lens through which we can view the greater mission of PPS. Place Governance Place Capital Healthy Communities Building Community Through Transportation Architecture of Place Entrepreneurial Places: Markets, Main Streets, and Beyond Creating Multi-Use Public Destinations Team Jobs & Internships Press Room Contact Us Placemaking Leadership Council
  12. Cette ancienne église transformée en centre communautaire est à l’abandon depuis longtemps. La voici endommagée par un effondrement, elle sera probablement démolie dans un proche avenir.
  13. peekay

    Costly city projects

    Montréal doesn't seem so bad when you compare to the project management of the NYC Port Authority..WOW http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/03/nyregion/the-4-billion-train-station-at-the-world-trade-center.html?ref=nyregion&_r=2 How Cost of Train Station at World Trade Center Swelled to $4 Billion With its long steel wings poised sinuously above the National September 11 Memorial in Lower Manhattan, the World Trade Center Transportation Hub has finally assumed its full astonishing form, more than a decade after it was conceived. Its colossal avian presence may yet guarantee the hub a place in the pantheon of civic design in New York. But it cannot escape another, more ignominious distinction as one of the most expensive and most delayed train stations ever built. The price tag is approaching $4 billion, almost twice the estimate when plans were unveiled in 2004. Administrative costs alone — construction management, supervision, inspection, monitoring and documentation, among other items — exceed $655 million. Even the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which is developing and building the hub, conceded that it would have made other choices had it known 10 years ago what it knows now. “It looks like a bird carcass picked clean. Not the intended symbolism, I'm sure.” “We would not today prioritize spending $3.7 billion on the transit hub over other significant infrastructure needs,” Patrick J. Foye, the authority’s executive director, said in October. The current, temporary trade center station serves an average of 46,000 commuters riding PATH trains to and from New Jersey every weekday, only 10,000 more than use the unassuming 33rd Street PATH terminal in Midtown Manhattan. By contrast, 208,000 Metro-North Railroad commuters stream through Grand Central Terminal daily. In fact, the hub, or at least its winged “Oculus” pavilion, could turn out to be more of a high-priced mall than a transportation nexus, attracting more shoppers than commuters. The company operating the mall, Westfield Corporation, promises in a promotional video that it will be “the most alluring retail landmark in the world.” But whatever its ultimate renown, the hub has been a money-chewing project plagued by problems far beyond an exotic and expensive design by its exacting architect, Santiago Calatrava, according to an examination based on two dozen interviews and a review of hundreds of pages of documents. The soaring price tag has also been fueled by the demands of powerful politicians whose priorities outweighed worries about the bottom line, as well as the Port Authority’s questionable management and oversight of private contractors. George E. Pataki, a Republican who was then the governor of New York, was considering a run for president and knew his reputation would be burnished by a train terminal he said would claim a “rightful place among New York City’s most inspiring architectural icons.” He likened the transportation hub to Grand Central and promised — unrealistically — that it would be operating in 2009. But the governor fully supported the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s desire to keep the newly rebuilt No. 1 subway line running through the trade center site, instead of allowing the Port Authority to temporarily close part of the line and shave months and hundreds of millions of dollars off the hub’s construction. That, however, would have cut an important transit link and angered commuters from Staten Island, a Republican stronghold, who use the No. 1 line after getting off the ferry. The authority was forced to build under, around and over the subway line, at a cost of at least $355 million.
  14. via Architectural Digest : True North With its magnetic mix of rugged individualism and European flair, Montreal exudes an irresistible French-Canadian joie de vivre Text by Mitchell Owens Tourists and travel guides often tout Montreal asa North American version of Paris. Pas vrai. Though the two cities’ abundant historic façades are predominantly limestone, Montreal’s are ash-gray, a rough-hewn contrast to Paris’s soufflé-gold luminosity. As for their all-important food scenes, Montreal’s muscular, hearty cuisine offers a robust counterpoint to the French capital’s refined traditions. And while the Québécois vernacular may have a sharper twang than what is spoken in France today, it’s actually more closely connected to French’s roots. Melissa Auf der Maur, the Montreal-born former guitarist for Hole and Smashing Pumpkins, once dismissed the provincial tongue as “hillbilly French”—only to have her mother, literary translator Linda Gaboriau, defend it as “the original French, the French of the kings.” In an increasingly globalized world, Montreal venerates its deep-seated local culture. French colonists settled Quebec in the early 1600s, and their descendants have never forgotten that intrepid foray, hence the province’s enduring separatist movement and its motto, Je me souviens—“I remember,” rendered pointedly en français. As Los Angeles–based AD100 architect Richard Landry, a University of Montreal alumnus, explains, “When you see those words on every license plate, it’s hard not to think about the patrimoine all the time.” Indeed, this city of 1.7 million, set on an island at the confluence of the St. Lawrence and Ottawa rivers, is infused with a pioneer spirit and an unpretentious pride in the homegrown. Cuisine is integral to this rich heritage—and a major reason Montreal remains a compelling destination long after summer’s festivals (most famously the International Jazz Festival) and carnivals have ended. “Montrealers reportedly spend more of their disposable income on eating out than on anything else,” says Andrew Torriani, the CEO and co-owner of the Ritz-Carlton Montréal hotel, a 1912 Beaux Arts landmark graced by the impeccable Maison Boulud restaurant, where executive chef Riccardo Bertolino plates suave international fare. The city is well-known for poutine, a tangle of frîtes topped with cheese curds and gravy. Auf der Maur swears by the version at Patati Patata (514-844-0216), a microscopic café close to Mount Royal Park, a 494-acre oasis designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. Diners craving more sophisticated menus can head to chef Normand Laprise’s hushed Toqué!, opposite the glittering business district’s colorful Palais des Congrès convention center and around the corner from the sleek W Montréal hotel. Chef-owners Hubert Marsolais and Claude Pelletier’s surf-and-turf mecca, Le Club Chasse et Pêche, on the other hand, is set amid the colonial gray-stone buildings of Old Montreal. Marsolais and Pelletier also collaborate with chef Michele Mercuri on the Italian-inflected brasserie Le Serpent, at the Ville-Marie arrondissement’s visual-arts center Fonderie Darling. Last year in the working-class Little Burgundy section—not far from the Old Port, where warehouses have been turned into cafés and inns, like the lofty Auberge du Vieux-Port hotel—chef-restaurateurs David McMillan and Frédéric Morin opened Le Vin Papillon, a charming wine bar. The new boîte is on the same block as the celebrated pair’s Liverpool House, a bistro with antler-bedecked walls, and Joe Beef, a tchotchke-filled gastropub that was recently ranked as Canada’s top restaurant, thanks to its lively confections like parfait of foie gras with Madeira jelly. Other daring chefs invigorating the city’s scene include François Nadon of the Latin Quarter’s Bouillon Bilk and Guillaume Cantin at Old Montreal’s Les 400 Coups. The city has a riveting collection of locally designed architecture as well. Starting with Moshe Safdie and his 1967 Habitat housing complex, a number of Canadian and Québécois talents have produced notable contemporary projects, including those in the Quartier des Spectacles, a network of performance halls, restaurants, galleries, fountains, and squares in the Latin Quarter. One of the district’s stars is the Grande Bibliothèque, a joint venture between Croft-Pelletier Architectes and Gilles Guité, both of Quebec City, and Vancouver’s Patkau Architects. The green-glass behemoth, containing multistory rooms walled with yellow-birch louvers, was hailed as “simple but wonderful” by Phyllis Lambert, Montreal’s architecture doyenne. The same could be said of Lambert’s own Canadian Centre for Architecture, which occupies an elegant 1989 building attached to a historic mansion in the Shaughnessy Village neighborhood. (The city does have a few outsider icons, namely Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s 1967 Westmount Square mixed-used complex, I. M. Pei’s 1962 Place Ville Marie skyscraper, and Roger Taillibert’s futuristic Olympic Stadium, a 1976 structure Landry calls “a very, very cool white elephant.”) Québécois art offers major-league delights, too. The works of powerhouse midcentury geometric painters Claude Tousignant and Guido Molinari are highlighted at the multivenue Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. And things are only looking up for current local talents, according to Lesley Johnstone, a curator at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal, which hosts the Montreal Biennial from October 22, 2014, to January 4, 2015. “Today the wealthy younger crowd whose families supported hospitals and the symphony are focusing on Canadian artists,” she observes. Among this new generation are Anne-Marie and Pierre Trahan, the maestros behind the two-year-old Arsenal Montréal, a contemporary art complex housed in a former shipyard in the Griffintown neighborhood. The 83,000-square-foot space is also home to the couple’s Division Gallery, which focuses on domestic talents such as multidisciplinary artists Nicolas Baier and Bonnie Baxter. After taking in Arsenal’s exhibitions, one can visit another Griffin-town magnet, a stretch of rue Notre-Dame Ouest known as Antiques Alley, where cafés alternate with treasure troves like Milord Antiquités and Antiquités L’Ecuyer (514-932-8461). Stylish Montrealers also dress Canadian, heading to Boutique Unicorn and Philippe Dubuc for fashions by their compatriots, while apparel star Marie Saint Pierre operates an eponymous flagship in downtown’s Golden Square Mile area. Boho-chic women—including Sharon Johnston, the wife of Canada’s governor general—step out in fascinatingly funky jewelry that designer Charlotte Hosten makes in her tiny appointment-only Mile End atelier. And at nearby Clark Street Mercantile, the brands primarily come from far beyond the province but share an earthy authenticity that feels absolutely Canadian. It’s a quality worth keeping in mind when exploring a city where roots and remembrance are everything. See more of Montreal's can't-miss destinations.
  15. Spoilers: Montreal didn't make the cut. http://edition.cnn.com/2014/11/23/travel/worlds-best-metro-stations/index.html
  16. Je suis tombé sur une superbe vidéo expliquant la construction du Lakhta Center à Saint-Pétersbourg (complétion prévue en 2018) Une fois complété le Lakhta Center deviendra le plus haut gratte-ciel d'Europe, dépassant de loin son plus proche concurrent (Federation Tower East [Vostok], 373 m à Moscou, en construction)
  17. The Eaton Center looks to be undergoing a small renovation of the Ste-Catherine entrance. So far they removed the ugly overhead protectors over the side walk and the larger one over the doors.
  18. Canadian Investor Bets on a Montreal Revival Cadillac Fairview Wants to Expand City's Business Center to the South By DAVID GEORGE-COSH Nov. 5, 2013 6:11 p.m. ET For more than two decades, Montreal was one of the sleepiest office markets in Canada, seeing no new private development as cities such as Toronto and energy-rich Calgary added millions of square feet of new space. Now, as Canadian investors step up real-estate investment throughout the world, a company owned by one of Canada's largest pension funds is looking to shake things up. Cadillac Fairview Corp., a unit of Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan, wants to expand the city's business center to the south with a planned 1.9 billion Canadian dollars ($1.82 billion) development next to the Bell Centre, where the National Hockey League's Montreal Canadiens play. The company earlier this year broke ground on the first building on the 9.2 acre site, named the Deloitte Tower after the professional-services firm that it lured from Montreal's traditional downtown. Owners of office buildings in Montreal's core dismiss the competitive threat, citing the lack of retail and transportation in the Deloitte Tower area. "I don't think that people who went to that location will be happy," says Bill Tresham, president of global investments at Ivanhoé Cambridge Inc., which owns the Place Ville Marie office complex that Deloitte is vacating. But Cadillac Fairview executives say businesses will be attracted to the tower's modern workspaces, energy efficiency and the civic square and skating rink in the complex modeled on New York's Rockefeller Center. "That's where we feel the growth is," says Sal Iacono, Cadillac's senior vice president for development in Eastern Canada. Developers in other cities have had mixed results when they have tried to build new business districts to compete with traditional downtowns. London's Canary Wharf development was forced to seek bankruptcy protection in its early years, although it eventually turned into a success. The Fan Pier project in Boston finally has gained traction after years of delay. The Cadillac Fairview development is partly a sign that Montreal has absorbed a glut of space that has hung over its office market for years. Its third-quarter vacancy rate for top-quality space downtown was 5.4%, compared with 9.4% in the third quarter of 2010, according to Cushman & Wakefield Inc. But the project also is a sign of the increasing appetite that Canadian investors have for real-estate risk as the world slowly recovers from the downturn. Canadian investors are on track to purchase at least US$15.6 billion of commercial real estate world-wide in 2013, up from US$14.5 billion in 2012, and a postcrash record, according to Real Capital Analytics Much of the interest is coming from Canadian pension funds, which have more of an appetite for risk than U.S. and European institutions because Canadian property wasn't hurt as badly by the downturn, experts say. The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, the country's largest pension fund, allocated 11.1% of its assets to real estate, for a total of C$20.9 billion, in the first quarter of fiscal 2014. That is up from 10.7% in the first quarter of fiscal 2013, for a total of C$17.7 billion. Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan has been aggressive in several other sectors as it tries to shore up its funding deficit amid stubbornly low interest rates. The fund last month acquired Busy Bees Nursery Group, the largest child-care provider in the United Kingdom, for an undisclosed sum, while contributing US$500 million to Hudson's Bay Co.'s purchase of Saks Fifth Avenue for US$2.9 billion in July. Over the past year, Teachers' also has made investments in Australian telecom companies, oil assets in Saskatchewan and a supplier of outdoor sports-storage systems. Cadillac Fairview's real-estate portfolio increased to C$16.9 billion at the end of 2012, the last period for which data is available, up from C$15 billion in 2011. Montreal has a population of 1.65 million and its business sector, which relies heavily on aerospace, information technology, pharmaceuticals and tourism, remained relatively healthy during the downturn. The last commercial office buildings in its modern office district were completed by private developers in 1992. Nearly 20% of the city's office inventory was built before 1960, more than in other large Canadian cities, according to Cushman & Wakefield. Other pension funds also are making new investments in Montreal's office market, though they are focusing on core properties. Ivanhoé Cambridge, an arm of Quebec-based pension fund Caisse de dépot et placement du Québec, spent more than C$400 million in August to acquire full control of the Place Ville Marie office complex, and is planning a C$100 million upgrade. Cadillac Fairview began assembling land for its project in 2009 when it acquired Windsor Station, a historic hub that dates to the 19th century. The area is southwest of Old Montreal, the historic section of the city near the St. Lawrence River. But the area has been unappealing to most office-building developers because it lacks many stores, restaurants or other amenities. "No one was interested in developing," Mr. Iacono says. The company has been planning a development including retail, office and residential space since then, but many were skeptical that businesses could be convinced to move outside of the city's traditional business center. That skepticism was damped when Deloitte announced plans to move. Then this year, the Alcan unit of mining giant Rio Tinto said it would move its headquarters to the top eight floors of the 500,000 square-foot tower, increasing its occupancy to 70%. Cadillac Fairview also has started building a 555-unit condo on the site. Eventually, the entire complex will include an additional 4 million square feet of office, retail and residential space as well as public areas. Deloitte executives say the new building—slated to open in 2015—was appealing because of its energy efficiency and green features such as stalls for charging electric cars. "This building is a catalyst for a whole energy for that part of the city," says Sheila Botting, national leader of real estate for Deloitte in Canada.
  19. Source: Rue89 L’artiste Banksy a quelques trucs à dire sur la tour du One World Trade Center, qui vient d’être achevée. Sur son site internet, il a mis en ligne un billet sur le sujet, écrit sur une fausse une du New York Times. Il explique qu’il a proposé son texte aux pages opinion du New York Times mais que le journal l’a refusé – contactée par The Atlantic Wire, la rédaction n’a pas encore répondu. Le texte ? Une violente charge contre la tour qui remplace les tours jumelles détruites le 11 septembre 2001. Banksy, « en tournée » à New York, considère que ce monument est la plus « grande agression visuelle » de la ville et le surnomme le « shyscraper », jeu de mots avec « shy » (timide) et « skyscraper » (gratte-ciel). Extraits : « Cet immeuble est un désastre. Non, les désastres sont intéressants. Le One World Trade Center est un non-événement. C’est de la vanille. On dirait un truc construit au Canada. » [Le Canada n’est pas connu pour la beauté de ses gratte-ciels, ndlr] [...] « Ce qui est remarquable pour une structure de cette taille, c’est que le One World Trade Center manque de confiance en lui. Comment fait-il pour tenir sans colonne vertébrale ? On dirait qu’il n’a jamais voulu exister. Il vous rappelle ce grand gamin dans une soirée qui baisse ses épaules bizarrement pour ne pas émerger de la foule. C’est la première fois que je vois un gatte-ciel timide. » [...] « On pourrait voir le One World Trade Center comme une trahison de tous ceux qui ont perdu la vie le 11 septembre, car il proclame clairement que les terroristes ont gagné. Ces dix hommes nous ont condamnés à vivre dans un monde plus médiocre que celui qu’ils ont attaqué, au lieu d’être les catalyseurs d’un nouveau monde plus éblouissant. »
  20. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-31/downtown-nyc-landlords-remake-offices-in-shift-from-banks.htmlDowntown NYC Landlords Remake Offices in Shift From Banks By David M. Levitt - July 31, 2013 David Cheikin is betting that skateboard millionaires will be happy where the Thundering Herd once roamed. As vice president of leasing for Brookfield Office Properties Inc. (BPO), Cheikin is leading the push to remake lower Manhattan’s former World Financial Center into a destination for technology and media companies. Once home to the Merrill Lynch & Co., the brokerage firm known for its bull logo, the Hudson riverfront complex is now Brookfield Place New York, and much more than the name is changing. Brookfield is stripping away brass and marble trims and adding bicycle parking, free Wi-Fi in public spaces and electric-car charging stations. At Merrill’s former headquarters, clear glass is replacing the imposing, dark-tinted facade built as a barrier to the public, Cheikin said. “We’re just trying to work out ways to make it more in line with how people want to work today,” he said. Downtown landlords with millions of square feet of empty space are transforming offices that were designed for the global financial elite to better appeal to New York’s technology and media firms. They’re pitching their properties as an alternative to the converted factories of midtown south, where a frenzy of demand has pushed up rents and driven vacancies to the lowest in the U.S. The image makeover is only part of the challenge as the area faces a glut of space from skyscrapers that are nearing completion at the World Trade Center site. Empty Space Consolidating financial companies have left landlords with at least 6.3 million square feet (585,000 square meters) of space to fill, almost 7 percent of the lower Manhattan office market, according to data from brokerage Newmark Grubb Knight Frank. Another 2.4 million square feet remains unrented at two new trade center towers scheduled for completion by mid-2014. At Brookfield Place, vacancies loom on about a third of its 8 million square feet. Across the street at 1 World Trade Center, the Durst Organization is preparing a marketing campaign to convince creative firms that they’ll feel at home in the Western Hemisphere’s tallest building. Almost half of the tower, scheduled to open next year, is available for lease. Durst, equity partner with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey on the 1,776-foot (541-meter) skyscraper, is targeting companies that are in “phase-two growth, after the incubation startup stages,” said Tara Stacom, the Cushman & Wakefield Inc. vice chairman who is working with the developers on the leasing effort. New Construction “There’s something that the new construction can accommodate for all these tech users that the old construction can’t, and that is growth,” Stacom said. “A lot of these tenants are one size today, and they’re 200 times that size in less than a decade, and in some cases less than half a decade. We’re only now going out to speak to this audience.” Tenants could agree to take a small space at first, then expand into larger offices in the tower, Stacom said. As rents soar in the older buildings of midtown south, available government incentives and the efficiencies of new real estate would make the trade center more cost-effective, even at an asking rent of $75 a square foot, among the highest for downtown, she said. The tower’s open, column-free space offers more flexibility and the developers are even ready to duplicate a look that’s become popular with technology firms, leaving the ductwork exposed, Stacom said. Space ‘Mismatch’ About 1.4 million square feet are unspoken for in the skyscraper, which is slated to open to tenants next year and will have Conde Nast Publications Inc. as its anchor tenant. Another 1 million square feet are available at Silverstein Properties Inc.’s 4 World Trade Center, to open before year-end. There’s “a mismatch between the unprecedented amount of class A space currently available and the preferences of the tech sector for loft space in a neighborhood with a non-corporate vibe,” according to tenant brokerage Studley Inc. “Tech and creative-sector companies in Manhattan are indisputably growing by leaps and bounds,” Steven Coutts, senior vice president for national research at New York-based Studley, said in a July 24 report. “Nevertheless, this sector still lacks the heft to fill the void” left by contracting banks and other traditional office users, such as accounting and insurance companies. Lowest Rents Downtown Manhattan has the lowest rents and the highest office availability of the borough’s three major submarkets. The availability rate -- empty space and offices due to become vacant within 12 months -- was almost 16 percent at the end of June, up from 10.8 percent a year earlier, data from CBRE Group Inc. show. Asking rents jumped 20 percent to an average of $47.13 a square foot, a reflection of landlords’ expectations for the high-end space added to the market in the past year, according to Los Angeles-based CBRE. Rents in midtown south -- including such neighborhoods as Chelsea, the Flatiron District and Soho -- averaged $63.44 a square foot and the availability rate was 10 percent. Brookfield has about 2.7 million square feet of former Merrill offices to fill at its namesake complex. Bank of America Corp. (BAC), which took over the space when it bought Merrill in 2009, is keeping about 775,000 square feet and will stop paying rent on the rest in September when its leases expire. At Merrill’s former headquarters at 250 Vesey St., the vacant restaurant that once housed the Hudson River Club, where brokers dined on grouse and pheasant, has been removed. It’s now an open area where anyone can gaze at the Statue of Liberty in the distance. The change is part of a $250 million makeover of the World Financial Center’s retail space that will include an upscale food market and eateries that overlook the marina. Transit Hub Another selling point, according to Cheikin, will be the completion in the next two years of a $3.94 billion transit hub designed by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. Brookfield is close to completing a 55-foot glass entryway supported by a pair of cyclone-shaped steel columns that will link Brookfield Place with the transportation center. Across town on the East River waterfront, SL Green Realty Corp. (SLG) is marketing about 900,000 square feet at 180 Maiden Lane, a black-glass tower south of the Brooklyn Bridge. Most of that is space that American International Group Inc. (AIG), once the world’s largest insurer, will vacate next year. SL Green, Manhattan’s biggest office landlord, is spending $40 million on renovations that include making over the interior plaza, as well as AIG’s cafeteria, auditorium and health club to transform them into “communal-type amenities,” said Steve Durels, director of leasing. Soul Cycle “I want the cafeteria to look like it’s a Starbucks, and I want the fitness center to look like it’s a Soul Cycle,” Durels said. “And I want the auditorium to look like the presentation space you’d find in a W Hotel.” Most importantly, he said, the ground-floor atrium will work like an indoor park, with seating areas where people can get a coffee and work on their laptops. Half of the floor will be covered in artificial turf, where tenants could arrange a volleyball, badminton or bocce game. So far, downtown landlords’ efforts to land creative firms have borne little fruit. Some of the industry’s biggest names -- Yahoo! Inc., EBay Inc., LinkedIn Corp., Microsoft Corp. and Facebook Inc. -- have opted to go elsewhere. Yahoo took four floors in the century-old former New York Times headquarters in Midtown, while LinkedIn went to the 82-year-old Empire State Building. EBay chose a onetime department store on Sixth Avenue in Chelsea that dates back to the 1890s, when the corridor was known as Ladies’ Mile. ‘Iconic’ Firms Facebook went to the East Village, taking about 100,000 square feet in 770 Broadway, which was designed in 1905 by Daniel Burnham, the architect who conceived the Flatiron Building. The social-media company joins tenants including AOL Inc. and the Huffington Post in the 15-story property. “Those firms are all iconic,” said Miles Rose, founder of SiliconAlley.com, a Web-based community for New York’s emerging technology industry. “The big, plain boxes don’t work for either their corporate culture or their workers. Older, iconic buildings have character and they have presence.” Of the 50 largest Manhattan leases made by technology, media, information and fashion tenants in the past two years, only 10 were in buildings completed later than 1970, according to Compstak Inc., a New York-based provider of leasing data. When 10gen Inc., maker of MongoDB data-management software, sought to expand out of its Soho offices last year, “downtown wasn’t exactly right for us,” said Eliot Horowitz, co-founder and chief technology officer. “We wanted some place that was pretty wide-open and feeling kind of lofty. We sort of wanted a Soho feel, but with a lot more flexibility and a lot more space than you can actually get in Soho.” Older Buildings 10Gen wound up taking about 32,000 square feet at the Times Building, he said. This month, it expanded its commitment to almost 50,000 square feet. Some creative companies that have gone downtown have favored the market’s older buildings. When HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. agreed to leave its longtime Midtown headquarters, it took 180,000 square feet at 195 Broadway, a colonnaded tower built in 1916 that was originally the American Telephone & Telegraph Co. building. WeWork, a company founded three years ago to provide shared office space to startups, took 120,500 square feet at 222 Broadway, a 27-story property completed in 1961 that once housed Merrill offices. Brooklyn Projects Brooklyn, across the East River from lower Manhattan, may emerge as competition for technology and media tenants. Developers have plans for about 630,000 square feet of offices at the former Domino Sugar plant on the Williamsburg neighborhood’s waterfront. In an industrial district near the Brooklyn Bridge, 1.2 million square feet of buildings long-owned by the Jehovah’s Witnesses are under contract to be sold to a partnership that may make much of the space into offices. New York’s Economic Development Corp. projects that fast-growing technology companies will need an additional 20 million square feet of space over the next 12 years, and they’ll be seeking rents of less than $40 a square foot. Melissa Coley, a Brookfield spokeswoman, declined to say what rents it’s seeking at Brookfield Place. The landlord last week said it had rented about 191,000 square feet combined to Bank of Nova Scotia, Oppenheimer Funds Inc. and fitness-club chain Equinox Holdings Inc. Earlier this year, it landed GFK SE, a German retail-research firm, for 75,000 square feet at 200 Liberty St., formerly 1 World Financial Center. GFK is moving from an older building in Chelsea. Trade Center The World Trade Center site is poised to get its second large media tenant. GroupM, an advertising planning and placement firm owned by WPP Inc., is working on terms to lease 515,000 square feet at 3 World Trade Center, according to two people with knowledge of the talks. The skyscraper, slated for completion in 2016, is being developed by Larry Silverstein, who considered capping the tower at seven stories if he couldn’t land an anchor tenant. If he goes ahead with building it to the full 80-story height, he’ll have another 2 million square feet to fill. The 70,000-square-foot spaces planned for 3 World Trade Center, called “trading floors” on the developer’s website, can be designed for “any industry,” according to Jeremy Moss, Silverstein’s director of leasing. GroupM is planning to use some of the five base floors, according to the people. Greg Taubin, a broker at Studley who represented 10gen, said certain technology tenants will be tempted by landlords’ efforts, while others “won’t go below 14th Street, period.” “It’s very tenant-specific,” he said. “But as midtown south continues to be tight for these types of tenants, certain buildings downtown will be the beneficiaries of this.” To contact the reporter on this story: David M. Levitt in New York at dlevitt@bloomberg.net To contact the editor responsible for this story: Kara Wetzel at kwetzel@bloomberg.net ®2013 BLOOMBERG L.P. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
  21. Source: Houzz (Le copier-Coller est tellement long, ça ne me tente pas de l'éditer, allez voir l'article pour une lecture plus facile) Residents of Montreal didn't UNESCO's crowning it the City of Design in 2006 to reaffirm their love affair with their city. Referred to as Canada's cultural capital, Montreal can claim bragging rights to a summer full of international festivals along with world-renowned architecture and stylish bars and restaurants. As you read through this guide, put together by myself and fellow Montreal native Laura Garner, visualize yourself admiring the unique art installations of each metro station, walking through more than 32 kilometers (20 miles) of tunnels in the Underground City or riding in a horse-drawn carriage through the cobblestone streets in the very European area of Old Montreal. No matter how you choose to get somewhere in the city, Montreal always has a way of surprising you along the way. More city guides for design junkies This view of the St. Lawrence river shows off the beauty of the Montreal skyline at night and includes the Bell Center (where the Montreal Canadiens play hockey). This photo was taken from one of the bridges that connects Cité du Havre (a strip of land where the Habitat 67 community is located; see below) to the Île Sainte-Hélène, which houses La Ronde amusement park and is home to the popular indie music festival Osheaga and the Formula 1 racetrack. A couple notes on the information that follows: We have included the nearest metro stop and have highlighted design destinations by neighborhood. Must-Sees Mount Royal Park: A 200-hectare (about 500-acre) park in the heart of the city Location: From Côte-de-Neiges Road to Park Avenue, between avenue des Pins and Voie Camillien Houde (metro: Mont-Royal) Noteworthy: Lookout points throughout the park offer the best views of the city, day or night. Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted (the designer of New York's iconic Central Park), Mount Royal is a year-round congregating spot for residents and tourists alike. Summertime brings long walks around the pond and picnics under the trees, while winter offers ice skating. If you're in Montreal on a Sunday in the summertime, head to the Sir George-Étienne Cartier monument to see the free, unofficial event known as the Tam-Tams, where hundreds of people gather to drum and dance under the sun. by Laura Garner » Habitat 67: A stunning 12-story apartment complex designed by architect Moshe Safdie Location: 2600 avenue Pierre-Dupuy (near the casino) Noteworthy: The apartments are designed with lots of privacy, terrace gardens and multiple levels that face the St. Lawrence river. Designed in 1967 by Montreal architect Moshe Safdie for his master thesis, and debuting at the Expo 67 world's fair, the revolutionary 146-residence housing complex places single-family dwellings in an urban environment. More info: Habitat 67 by Laura Garner » Palais de Congres: Montreal's convention center Location: 159 rue St. Antoine West (metro: Place-D'Armes) Noteworthy: Located between the downtown core and Old Montreal, the Palais features 113 rooms and venues. Its multicolored glass facade is made up of 332 colored glass panels and 58 transparent panels. More info: Palais de Congress by Laura Garner » Grande Bibliothèque: Montreal's largest public library Location: 475 boulevard de Maisonneuve East (metro: Berri-UQAM) Noteworthy: Built in 2005 and located in the bustling Latin Quarter downtown, with direct access to the metro and Underground City, this contemporary six-story building has large horizontal plates of glass running along the complete exterior. The space includes an exhibition hall, a theater and a complete floor for children as well as top-of-the line audiovisual equipment. More info: Grande Bibliothèque by Laura Garner » Notre Dame Basilica: Centuries-old basilica Location: 110 Notre-Dame Street West, corner of Saint Sulpice Street (metro: Place D'Armes) Cost: $5 Canadian (about U.S.$5) for adults; $4 for ages 7 to 17; free for children 6 and under Noteworthy: Its opulent and colorful interior hosts about 100 weddings each year, with Celine Dion being among those who have tied the knot here. This is a beautiful example of the Gothic revival style of architecture; it was the first of its kind to be built in Canada. The basilica displays stained glass windows that feature the history of religion in Montreal, which is not typically done. More info: Notre Dame Basilica by Esther Hershcovich » Must-Eats Le Confessionnal: Trendy bar Location: 431 rue McGill in Old Montreal (metro: Square Victoria) Cost: From $9 Canadian (about U.S.$9) per cocktail Noteworthy: Seductive red decor and dim lighting from chandeliers make for a moody atmosphere After a few drinks, Old Montreal doesn't disappoint for foodies. The area is a design lover's paradise. Try the three-course lunch menu for $28 Canadian within the black-painted walls of the popular Les 400 Coups (400 Notre Dame Est). If you're lucky enough to get a reservation, make sure to eat dinner at Garde Manger (408 rue St. François Xavier), owned by celebrity chef Chuck Hughes. Besides bar Le Confessionnal, try an after-dinner drink at the Philemon Bar (111 rue St. Paul Ouest), known for its laid-back yet trendy ambience. Don't forget to admire its decor, done by Montreal interior designer Zébulon Perron. More info: Le Confessional, Les 400 Coups, Garde Manger, Philemon Bar by Amielle Clouatre » Bar Pullman: Upscale bar Location: 3424 avenue du Parc, corner of Sherbrooke downtown (metro: Place des Arts) Cost: From $4.50 Canadian for a 2-ounce glass of wine to $5 Canadian for tapas Noteworthy: Upscale yet understated ambience This wine bar is something of a hidden gem in the downtown core of Montreal, offering wine samplers and delicious tapas to accompany them (try the foie gras). If you want a casual meal, check out Lola Rosa (545 rue Milton), a cozy vegetarian eatery in the McGill ghetto that is very popular with university students. Across the city are several locations of the crisp white tea shops called David's Tea, recently lauded by Oprah. Be sure to smell them all. More info: Pullman, Lola Rosa, David's Tea by Laura Garner » L'Ambroisie: A popular French restaurant Location: 4020 St. Ambroise, in the historic Chateau St.-Ambroise, Little Burgundy and St. Henri (Sud-Ouest) neighborhood (metro: Place St. Henri) Cost: From $19 Canadian for a table d'hôte dinner Noteworthy: The hallway of the building leading to the entrance displays quirky antique items such as suits of armor and a circus caravan. Housed in the Chateau St.-Ambroise along the Lachine Canal, this charming restaurant displays an eclectic mix of industrial architectural elements combined with Greco-Roman features. Offering French cuisine, this restaurant is something you have to try at least once. Other noteworthy suggestions for a gourmet meal in the neighboring areas of Montreal include Joe Beef and Tuck Shop — make sure to make a reservation. If you're in the mood for a picnic, be sure to stop by the Atwater Market farmer's market to pick up fresh fruits, meats and cheeses. More info: L'Ambroisie, Joe Beef, Tuck Shop, Atwater Market by Esther Hershcovich » Baldwin Barmacie: A design-minded bar Location: 115 avenue Laurier Ouest in Plateau and Mile End (metro: Laurier) Cost: Drinks start at $7 Canadian Noteworthy: The design evokes a contemporary pharmacy theme. If you want to feel transported back to the Mad Men era, the decor and drink list at Baldwin Barmacie are sure to please. Midcentury modern decor gets an update with neutral colors and clean lines. If you're a fan of cocktails, a must-try is the hip bar Distillerie (with three locations in central Montreal). The biggest hit? Delicious and creative cocktails presented in mason jars. If you're on the hunt for a breakfast spot in the Plateau, look no farther than Resto Fabergé, a breakfast place with a lounge atmosphere. The interior design, done by the architects at laroche et gagné, is bright and fun and worth a look. Try the breakfast poutine. More info: Baldwin Barmacie, La Distillerie, Resto Fabergé by Les Enfants Terribles Brasserie » Les Enfants Terribles: Restaurant and bar Location: 1257 Bernard Ouest in Mile End/Outremont Cost: Cocktails start at $10 Canadian, tartare plates start at $14 Canadian Noteworthy: Rustic wood, chalkboards and murals all add charm to this brasseries and its terrace, designed by architect Louis-Joseph Papineau. If you're up for rich French pastries, a walk up the block will take you to Boulangerie Cheskie. On the must-try list is the chocolate babka. St.-Viateur Bagel is another classic stop in the area. Open 24/7, this legendary shop has been mentioned in various books and films. More info: Les Enfants Terribles, St.-Viateur Bagel Must-Dos Place des Arts: A performing arts center Location: 175 rue St. Catherine Ouest (metro: Place des Arts) Noteworthy: The center holds festivals throughout the year, including the Jazz Festival, Just for Laughs and Montreal's Nuit Blanche. Want to see Marie-Antoinette performed by les Grands Ballets Canadiennes? Head to one of Place des Arts' 10 halls. The Symphony Hall, with an interior made almost completely of light beech, is the most recent addition to the complex. A metro ride away, on St. Laurent, is the Society for Arts and Technology (SAT), a nonprofit center featuring cutting-edge audiovisual experiences for everyone. More info: Place des Arts, SAT by Laura Garner » Canadian Center for Architecture Location: 1920 rue Baile, downtown (Rene-Levesque Boulevard and rue Saint Marc), (metro: Georges Vanier) Cost: $10 Canadian for adults; $7 Canadian for seniors; free for students and children; free for all on Thursday evenings Noteworthy: The Canadian Center for Architecture (CCA) was built in 1979 with the goal of raising awareness of the role of architecture in society. Across the street you can find the CCA Garden, a public sculpture installation by Montreal architect Melvin Charney. More info: Canadian Center for Architecture by Esther Hershcovich » Architectural Bike Tour: A guided four-hour adventure through the streets of Old Montreal Location: 27 rue de la Commune Est (metro: Champ de Mars) Cost: Rentals starting at $6.50 Canadian Noteworthy: You can also see it on your own by downloading the Architecture Walking Tour app. Relax after a long day of exploring at Spa Bota Bota, a serene five-deck boat anchored on the St. Lawrence river. More info: Architectural Bike Tour, Spa Bota Bota by Esther Hershcovich » Must-Stays Hotel Gault Location: 449 rue St. Helene (metro: Square Victoria) Cost: From $178 Canadian Noteworthy: Minimalistic design contrasted by large French windows on a corner located steps away from the downtown area. This luxurious 1871 hotel has 30 suites and a restaurant. Spend some quiet time in its library, complete with a warm fireplace for the cold nights. More info: Hotel Gault by Laura Garner » LHotel Location: 262 St. Jacques West in Old Montreal (metro: Square Victoria) Cost: From $135 Canadian Noteworthy: The collection of artwork on display is fit for a museum. This boutique hotel is in the heart of Old Montreal. Owned by Georges Marciano of clothing brand Guess, the LHotel has become the permanent home for Marciano's extensive personal pop art collection, including works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Damien Hirst. More info: LHotel by Hotel St. Paul » Hôtel St. Paul Location: 355 McGill Street in Old Montreal (metro: Square Victoria) Cost: From $195 Canadian Noteworthy: This was Old Montreal's first boutique hotel. Using the four elements of fire, ice, earth and ocean as inspiration, this Old Montreal boutique hotel has a monochromatic color palette and natural textures that give the decor a soft, ethereal feeling. More info: Hôtel St. Paul by Laura Garner » Loft Hotel Location: 334-336 Terasse St. Denis in the Plateau (metro: Sherbrooke) Cost: From $125 Canadian Noteworthy: The building was once used as storage space for Canadian Armed Forces tanks. Completed in 1920 by prominent Montreal architect Ernest Cormier, the building that houses the Loft Hotel is one of Montreal's enduring art deco landmarks. The building was recently converted into loft-style hotel rooms, which are as spacious as they are trendy. More info: Loft Hotel by Esther Hershcovich » Must-Visit Shops Les Touilleurs: Cooking supply store Location: 152 avenue Laurier Ouest in the Mile End (metro: Laurier) Noteworthy: Pick up a free recipe-of-the-week card. The large, open chalet-style kitchen is where you'll find the top cooking supplies for your culinary needs. It was designed by architect Luce Lafontaine with large, open cabinetry to make you feel at home. Classes are offered onsite three nights a week by local chefs. A walk around the corner will take you to Jamais Assez, where you'll find a large selection of locally made furniture and creative accessories. Le Boutique Artisanal Une Monde is a warehouse on a side street that carries a selection of Asian-inspired and restored furniture at affordable prices. If you want to scout for some more boho home accents, Buk&Nola will have what you're looking for. This shop is known for its casual chic decor. The owners offer a decorating service as well. More info: Les Touilleurs, Jamais Assez, Buk&Nola by Esther Hershcovich » L'Affichiste: Vintage poster gallery Location: 471 rue Saint François Xavier in Old Montreal (metro: Place D'armes) Noteworthy: The largest collection of original vintage posters in Montreal is housed in this gallery, attached by underground tunnels to the Notre Dame Basilica. A storage room is housed in a walk-in vault. If you're still looking for that perfect piece of art, take a walk down to La Rue des Artistes. It might be where you'll find that coup de coeur, French for "favorite find." Keep walking and you'll arrive at the large indoor Marché Bonsecours market, where local artisans sell everything from furniture to clothing and unique umbrellas. More info: L'Affichiste, Marché Bonsecours by Esther Hershcovich » Style Labo: Shop selling vintage and new items Location: 5765 St. Laurent Blvd in Plateau/Mile End (metro: Rosemont) Noteworthy: The antique lights collection If you're looking for a large collection of industrial-style vintage and new items, this is the place to visit. The store's decor transports you to a different time. If you're looking for a design experience, Les Commissaires doubles as a gallery and boutique, selling bold designer pieces from around the world. It is constantly restocked with a mix of innovative, sometimes provocative items attesting to the city's flair for the mix offered in its design. Monastiraki is another vintage shop; it also serves as a community art center. Search through its cabinets for vintage and locally made prints. More info: Style Labo, Les Commissaires, Monastiraki by Surface Jalouse » Surface Jalouse: Print shop Location: 2672 rue Notre-Dame West in Little Burgundy (metro: Lionel Groulx) Noteworthy: Surface Jalouse is able to print images (the shop's or your own) onto virtually any surface — including furniture. Part furniture store and part studio, this boutique offers funky and highly unique home decor items. While you're on Notre Dame street, head west to explore the strip of antiques stores and curiosity shops. More info: Surface Jalouse by Esther Gibbons » Hidden Gems Gibeau Orange Julep: Landmark and fast-food restaurant Location: 7700 Decarie Boulevard (metro: Namur) Noteworthy: On Wednesday nights during the summer, the lot fills with classic vintage cars and motorbike enthusiasts. Since the 1960s the Julep has been one of the city's most recognizable landmarks, with its distinct fiberglass orange shape and colored party flags hanging off the side. Roller skating waitresses originally brought food to the cars, but they have been replaced by a top fast-food service. The Gibeau Orange Julep (an orange drink), offered when the shop opened in 1932, is still what attracts most customers. More info: Gibeau Orange Julep Réne Lévesque Park: Sculpture park Location: 1 chemin de Musee, (metro: Angrignon) Noteworthy: Admire 22 monumental sculptures at this park, located off the Lachine Canal bike path and offering panoramic views of the Saint Lawrence and Saint Louis rivers. Enjoy a picnic with your family, rent a kayak or enjoy the open and green 4 kilometers of walking trails. More info: Parc René-Lévesque by Esther Hershcovich » Spazio: Antiques shop Location: 8405 boulevard St. Laurent (metro: Jarry) Noteworthy: Architectural detailing from various time periods can be easily found in this two-story shop that was once a well-known tavern. It's divided into neat sections, so you can discover a room filled with antique doors or sections for stained glass windows, vintage handles or knobs. The owner is continually expanding as the collection grows. More info: Spazio Tell us: What are your favorite places for soaking up design in Montreal?
  22. IluvMTL

    bon appétit

    THE NAVIGATOR Where to Eat and Drink in Montreal 11:00 AM / APRIL 23, 2013 / POSTED BY Bon Appetit 29 COMMENTS (0) What Broadway is to New York City, Boulevard Saint-Laurent (or, as locals refer to it, La Main) is to Montreal: the city's main artery and the ideal way to discover some of the best old- and new-school restaurants Picnic Spot Kentucky-born chef Colin Perry cooks his grandmother's Southern recipes, like pinto beans studded with smoked hog jowls and served with cornbread and green-tomato relish. And while Dinette Triple Crown has a few seats for eating inside, most patrons get their fried chicken thighs and meat 'n' threes packed in nifty picnic boxes and take them to the Little Italy park between La Main and Rue Clark. Fried chicken thighs and meat 'n' threes at Dinette Triple Crown British Accent Looking for crazy-high-quality ingredients prepared in a straightforward, un-gimmicky way? Look no further than Lawrence. While the food is ostensibly British-style nose-to-tail cooking (as in rabbit offal tart, lamb's heart with prunes and bacon, or marinated smelt with beets), chef Marc Cohen is of the Mediterranean-inspired school, which means there's an un-remitting emphasis on seasonality. The smart cocktail and wine list is curated by rising-star sommelier Etheliya Hananova, the pastries span such French standards as tarte Tatin and praline-filled éclairs, and the weekend brunch is deservedly the most popular in town. Style-Central The cozy-chic Hotel Herman is a brand-new dinner spot in Mile End. Featuring a U-shaped bar and open kitchen, the elegant space feels as though it belongs in a 1930s train station, a place where people are coming and going and everyone is happy to be there. With its focus on natural wines, pre-Prohibition cocktails, and small, shareable plates of precise, Scandinavian-influenced dishes (including Boileau deer with beets or homemade goat cheese with crosnes, a root vegetable), it's the ideal place for a late-night bite. Pre-Prohibition cocktail at Hotel Herman in Mile EndThe Institution Celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, the legendary Jewish steakhouse Moishes is as good as ever--if not better. The wood-paneled, chandeliered room is electrifying, the chopped liver appetizer is the tastiest version this side of the Borscht Belt, and the bone-in filet mignon will convert die-hard filet haters. (Those wanting a more traditionally marbled cut will like the charcoal-grilled rib eye.) For sides, get the boiled verenikas and the Monte Carlo potatoes, and maybe an order of grilled mushrooms if you're craving something umami. Insider tip: Their new late-night menu gets you an appetizer and an entrée for only $25 after 9 p.m. The kitchen at Moishes Hidden Gem It might be surrounded by discount electronics stores and punk bars, but Bouillon Bilk offers seriously refined cuisine. The room is stylish (think Nordic modernism) and the vibe laid-back and cool. Super-talented chef François Nadon specializes in high-wire flavor combinations like bone marrow with snails. It makes for a special night out before or after a concert at the nearby Quartier des Spectacles cultural center. Pop-Up Plus Montreal's red-light district isn't exactly where you'd expect to find the city's most exciting kitchen. Société des Arts Technologique's Labo Culinaire FoodLab serves rustic meals in a high-ceilinged space on the third floor of the glitzy new-media performance center. Creative duo Michelle Marek and Seth Gabrielse are deeply knowledgeable chef-bakers who simply make whatever they're passionate about at any given moment: One month they're serving Russian Easter classics or Chinatown favorites, another they're grilling souvlakis or doing an homage to Richard Olney's Provençal menus. Trust them. A dish at Labo Culinaire FoodLab Chinese Theater For a bare-bones basement noodle-shop experience--and one of the city's best cheap eats--you can't beat Nudo at lunch. The Chinatown fixture specializes in hand-pulled Lanzhou-style noodles, which you can watch being twirled while you wait for your food. (The loud thud of dough getting pounded around makes for a unique sound track.) Their braised beef shank noodle soup is profoundly satisfying. Don't miss the surprisingly good vegetable sides, especially at $1.25 each. Go ahead and splurge $5 on the top four: radish salad, spicy shredded potato, seaweed, and soybeans with potherb mustard. It's timeless, run down, and beat up in some places but stylish and spiffy in others. It's Boulevard Saint-Laurent--Montreal's main artery, known around these parts as La Main. Running all the way from the cobblestoned Old Port waterfront in the south of town up to the island's north shore, it divides Montreal into east and west, winding through established and emerging neighborhoods including Mile End, Chinatown, and Little Italy. A walk along it is a perfect way to get a sense of the city's heartbeat and to explore its booming restaurant scene, from classic joints to the most vibrant new places in town. And there are plenty of one-of-a-kind coffee spots and bakeries to sustain you on your journey. --Adam Leith Gollner Get Your Coffee Fix The three best cafés in a city famous for its café society are just steps away from La Main. Your expertly pulled espresso awaits: Café Sardine serves up superb third wave coffees using beans by Canadian roasters Phil & Sebastian. Bonus: The hot dogs at lunch are not to be missed. Barista Chrissy Durcak operates the mobile espresso truck Dispatch Coffee, which serves out of a garage on Avenue Van Horne in winter and roams the streets in summer. (Check dispatchcoffee.ca for locations.) For a traditional Italian café with deep conversations and stylish patrons, linger over lattes at the beloved Caffé San Simeon on Rue Dante. It's also a hit with many of the city's best chefs. No Pain, No Gain Like any self-respecting Francophone metropolis, Montreal takes its boulangeries seriously. The current leader of the pack is Joe La Croûte, near the Jean Talon market. (Its chestnut-flour bread and Kamut baguettes are winners.) Good loaves can also be found at Boulangerie Guillaume in the Mile End. Some of the best croissants in the city are made at Au Kouign-Amann, a short stroll from La Main down Avenue du Mont-Royal. Be sure to try a slice of its namesake pastry, a buttery Breton cake. Where to Stay Casa Bianca is an upscale B&B in an old home in the Plateau neighborhood overlooking Mont Royal Park. The Hotel 10, formerly The Opus, is perched on the corner of Saint-Laurent and Rue Sherbrooke, making it a good base for exploring La Main. (Credit: Photographs by Dominique Lafond, Illustrations by Claire McCracken) Adam Leith Gollner is the author of The Fruit Hunters and The Book of Immortality, to be released this summer. RELATED Montreal: For Lovers of Food Sugar-Shack Cuisine from Martin Picard Mile End Sandwiches: Beyond the Brisket More from The Navigator Read More http://www.bonappetit.com/blogsandforums/blogs/badaily/2013/04/montreal-boulevard-saint-laurent.html#ixzz2RQ3MznDh
  23. According to Leftcoaster on SSP - some more developments in the works around the Bell Center with apparently neat architecture. However one big idea was apparently abandoned recently - I wonder why
  24. Miska

    Montreal seen from the ISS

    "City lights broadcast our existence into the night of space. Imagine how the Earth will look to astronauts in a century's time or longer? These images are incredibly difficult to take from a spacecraft traveling along at almost 28,000 kilometers per hour. The images are held at NASA's Johnson Space Center in a special archive for astronaut photography. Watch for the great cities of Beijing, Istanbul, Melbourne, Montreal, London, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Buenos Aires, Brasilia (one of our favorites), and more." [video=youtube;-RGNhZ292Zg]